Now and Next: The Present and Future
of the American National Election Studies

September 5, 2009

Toronto, Canada

ANES Presentation at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting

Jon A. Krosnick, Department of Communication, Stanford University
Arthur Lupia, Department of Political Science, University of Michigan
Matthew DeBell, Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, Stanford University
Keith Payne, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina
Vincent L. Hutchings, Department of Political Science, University of Michigan
Simon Jackman, Department of Political Science, Stanford University
Gary M. Segura, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

The American National Election Studies   View the presentation pdf

What's Now and What's Next: The Affect Misattribution Procedure in the American National Election Studies   View the presentation pdf

The American National Election Studies, 2009-2013   View the presentation pdf

The purpose of this roundtable was to discuss and evaluate the present and future of the American National Election Studies. The roundtable began with a series of short presentations. Dr. Krosnick and Dr. Lupia reflected on the successes and failures of the new strategies that they brought to the ANES over the last four years.

Dr. DeBell assessed the new ANES Panel Study.

Dr. Payne, a psychologist, presented evidence from ANES' inclusion of Affect Misattribution Procedures on its 2008 Time Series and Panel Studies (AMP). AMPs are an innovative and increasingly popular means of measuring implicit attitudes about sensitive matters such as race. ANES' inclusion of AMP and Implicit Attitude Tests (IAT) on its surveys mark the first time for which these innovative psychological instruments have been included on large, nationally representative surveys.

Drs. Hutchings, Jackman, and Segura discussed plans for the next four years of the ANES (2009-2013). They described which current ANES practices will be continued and they described new ideas for increasing the value of the ANES to science and society.

After these presentations were made, panelists and audience members participated in a Questions and Answers. Audience members shared their views of what the ANES has been, the value of its recent changes, and their ideas for increasing its value to scholarship. The roundtable participants thank the audience for their participation.