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ANES Principal Investigators

Vincent Hutchings

Vincent Hutchings


Department of Political Science, University of Michigan
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/polisci/people/ci.hutchingsvincent_ci.detail

Vincent Hutchings is a Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan and a Research Professor at the Institute for Social Research. He received his Ph.D. in 1997 from the University of California, Los Angeles. Professor Hutchings teaches courses in African American politics, public opinion and voting behavior, and legislative behavior in the US. His research interests focus on the circumstances under which citizens are attentive to political matters and engage in issue voting. He published a book on this topic entitled Public Opinion and Democratic Accountability in 2003, from Princeton University Press. His research also examines the ways in which political appeals carried through the mass media can influence attitudes about salient social groups such a racial and ethnic minorities and women. Additionally, his work has explored the ways in which political campaigns can frame information about racial issues in order to activate and make politically relevant voter attitudes about particular racial groups. His current project focuses on inter-racial and inter-ethnic competition and the ways in which elite communications can exacerbate or diminish inter-group conflict. His work has appeared in the American Sociological Review, the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Politics, the Annual Review of Political Science, Political Communication, Public Opinion Quarterly, Political Psychology, the Journal of Communication and Legislative Studies Quarterly. Professor Hutchings has received multiple grants from the National Science Foundation, most recently (2009) for his project entitled "Elite Communications and Racial Group Conflict in the 21st Century." In 2004, he served as co-Principal Investigator of the National Politics Study, a national survey of Whites, Latinos, African Americans, Afro-Caribbeans and Asian Americans. From 2000-2002 he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Scholar at Yale University. He served on the American National Election Study (ANES) Board from 2005-2009, and also took on the role as Associate Principal Investigator of the study from 2007-2009.
Simon Jackman

Simon Jackman


Department of Political Science, Stanford University
http://jackman.stanford.edu/

Simon Jackman is Professor of Political Science and (by courtesy) Statistics at Stanford University. He received his PhD from the University of Rochester in 1995. Prior to his Stanford appointment he was on the faculty at the University of Chicago (1994-96) and a visiting graduate student at Princeton University (1991-94). He was a Visiting Professor at the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney (2009) and a Fellow at Research School of the Social Sciences, Australian National University (1996-97).

Jackman's work spans many aspects of American politics and political methodology. His book, Bayesian Analysis for the Social Sciences, a 600 page statistics text, was published by John Wiley in late 2009. In 2007-08 Jackman collaborated with Lynn Vavreck to field a Web-based, six wave, panel study of the American electorate (the Co-operative Campaign Analysis Project); a study of the dynamics of public opinion of the 2008 presidential primary campaign (coauthored with Vavreck) has appeared in the Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties. Other recent publications include "Measuring District Preferences with Implications for the Study of U.S. Elections" with Matt Levendusky and Jeremy Pope, Journal of Politics, 2008, 70(3): 736-753; "The Limits of Deliberative Discussion: A Model of Everyday Political Argument", Journal of Politics, 2006, 68(2): 272-283; "Pooling the Polls Over an Election Campaign", Australian Journal of Political Science, 2005, 40(4):499-517; "The Statistical Analysis of Roll Call Data", with Joshua Clinton and Douglas Rivers, American Political Science Review, 2004, 98(2):355-370. Earlier research has appeared in the journals listed above and PS: Political Science and Politics, the British Journal of Political Science, Electoral Studies, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Annual Reviews of Political Science and Political Analysis. Jackman serves on the editorial boards of the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, Electoral Studies, Public Opinion Quarterly, and he is a co-editor of Annual Reviews of Political Science and an associate editor of Political Analysis. He served as President of the Society for Political Methodology in 2003-05. At Stanford he co-directs the Methods of Analysis Program in the Social Sciences, and (with Gary Segura) the Stanford Center for American Democracy.

Jackman has considerable experience as a survey researcher, particularly in the Internet realm. In the 2000 election campaign, Jackman consulted for Knowledge Networks Inc, an Internet based survey research firm founded by Jackman's Stanford colleagues Douglas Rivers and Norman Nie. In 2002-04 Jackman served on the Board of the American National Election Studies. In addition to his work in 2007-08 with Lynn Vavreck on CCAP, Jackman has commissioned and fielded phone polls in France (with NSF support, with Paul Sniderman and French partners) and mixed-mode phone/Internet surveys in Australia, in a series of studies focusing on attitudes towards the United States, on behalf of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney.
Gary Segura

Gary M. Segura


Department of Political Science, Stanford University
http://politicalscience.stanford.edu/faculty/segura.html

Gary M. Segura is a Professor of American Politics in the Department of Political Science and Chair of Chicano/a Studies in the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. in American Politics and Political Philosophy from the University of Illinois in 1992.  His work focuses on issues of political representation, and currently is focusing on the accessibility of government and politics to America's growing Latino minority, as well as a book-length project on the links between casualties in international conflict and domestic politics.  Among his most recent publications are "The Mobilizing Effect of Majority-Minority Districts on Latino Turnout" (2004) and "Su Casa Es Nuestra Casa: Latino Politics Research and the Development of American Political Science," (2007), both in the American Political Science Review, "Earth Quakes and After Shocks: Race, Direct Democracy, and Partisan Change," (2006) and "Race and the Recall: Racial Polarization in the California Recall Election," (2008) both in the American Journal of Political Science, "Culture Clash? Contesting Notions of American Identity and the Effects of Latin American Immigration," in Perspectives on Politics (2006), and "All Politics are Still Local: the Iraq War and the 2006 Midterm Election" in PS: Political Science and Politics (2008). Earlier research has appeared in the Journal of Politics, Political Behavior, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Social Science Quarterly, the National Civic Review, the Harvard Journal of Hispanic Policy, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, and Rationality and Society, and his work has, on five occasions, been funded by the National Science Foundation. Segura was one of the co-Principal Investigator of the Latino National Survey, in 2006, and is the co-Principal Investigator of the "Spanish Translation and Latino Over-sample in the 2008 American National Election Study," the first ever expansion of the ANES into systematic Spanish interviewing and over-sampling of Latino voters. In 2009-10, he was the President of the Midwest Political Science Association. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Politics and the Political Research Quarterly. He is a former executive council member of the American Political Science Association, and Western Political Science Association. In 2006, he was the General Program Chair of the Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting, and in 2004-2005, he served as President of El Sector Latino de la Ciencia Política (Latino Caucus in Political Science).